Stanford Medicine Newsletter Updates For the Local Community

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Sound Bites

“I personally do not believe menopause is a disease state or that the decline in estrogen contributes to disease, with maybe the exception of bones.”

Marcia Stefanick, PhD, professor of medicine at the Stanford Prevention Research Center, on how the issue of hormone treatment for menopause continues to be hotly debated five years after the publication of a landmark study from the Women’s Health Initiative. Stefanick is chair of the national steering committee for the WHI study.

Philadelphia Inquirer, July 29


“By the end of next month, we expect 80 million people to be covered, roughly the size of the country of Germany.”

S.V. Mahadevan, MD, assistant professor of surgery, on the medical school’s partnership with the Emergency Management and Research Institute to develop a 911-type emergency medical system in India.

Palo Alto Daily News, May 10


“We can start to sort of speak the language of the brain using optical excitation.”

Karl Deisseroth, MD, PhD, assistant professor of bioengineering and of psychiatry and behavioral sciences, on a technique that uses light to control the activity of brain cells. The remote-control technology may someday serve as a treatment for neurological and psychiatric disorders.

New York Times, Aug. 14


“It’s very difficult for folks to move away from something that has been so widely accepted.”

David Cornfield, MD, professor of pediatrics, on a new study that found that universal tuberculosis testing in kindergarten-age children is outdated and a waste of money.

San Francisco Chronicle, July 7


“This is arguably the most important topic anyone will have in life, and education about it stops in high school unless you pursue a health-care career.”

Paul Auerbach, MD, clinical professor of surgery, on the importance of paying attention to medical symptoms.

Forbes.com, July 31

 

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